Download e-book for iPad: An Introduction to Spectroscopic Methods for the by F. Scheinmann (Eds.)

By F. Scheinmann (Eds.)

ISBN-10: 0080066623

ISBN-13: 9780080066622

ISBN-10: 0080167209

ISBN-13: 9780080167206

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Read Online or Download An Introduction to Spectroscopic Methods for the Identification of Organic Compounds. Mass Spectrometry, Ultraviolet Spectroscopy, Electron Spin Resonance Spectroscopy, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (Recent Developments), Use of Various Spectral PDF

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Extra info for An Introduction to Spectroscopic Methods for the Identification of Organic Compounds. Mass Spectrometry, Ultraviolet Spectroscopy, Electron Spin Resonance Spectroscopy, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (Recent Developments), Use of Various Spectral

Example text

Mass spectrum of N iV-di-isopropylmethylamine, molecular ion (XLVIII). Thus the major peaks in the spectrum(49) (Fig. 21) of iW-di-isopropy Ime thy lamine [mole­ cular ion (XLVIII), m/e 115] arise as shown. It is instructive to compare the spectrum with that (Fig. 20) of iW-diethylacetamide, which has the same molecular weight and also con­ tains a single nitrogen atom; the most significant difference is the peak at mje 44 in the + amide spectrum, which must represent the ion H2N(CH2)2 and this cannot arise by re­ arrangement from the amine.

Figure 18 shows part of the spectrum of the cyclic ketone menthone [molecular ion (XLV), m/e 154]. The major fragments arise as indicated(46) in Scheme 5; most interesting is that McLaiferty rearrangement gives an ion in which a retro-Diels-Alder fragmentation is possible, and this is the predominating mode of decomposition of this ion. (ii) Aromatic^ The molecular ion peak is pronounced, and the expected α-scissions occur. For mixed ketones, the positive charge resides preferentially on fragments containing the aromatic nucleus, these further break down as indicated above for aromatic aldehydes.

Loss of CO is not a favoured process (but loss of CH2^- CH2 occurs, and these are not readily differentiated except by accurate mass measurement), but H2O is lost from the molecular ion. , 1 100 154 1 IL l ^ _1 ) 1. 1 1 110 ,1 J . Il ÜJL ,-1 U , , ■ \ ' 1—I ( > - ^ -1 J11 120 130 140 150 m/e FIG. 18. Part of the mass spectrum of menthone, molecular ion (XLV). Figure 18 shows part of the spectrum of the cyclic ketone menthone [molecular ion (XLV), m/e 154]. The major fragments arise as indicated(46) in Scheme 5; most interesting is that McLaiferty rearrangement gives an ion in which a retro-Diels-Alder fragmentation is possible, and this is the predominating mode of decomposition of this ion.

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An Introduction to Spectroscopic Methods for the Identification of Organic Compounds. Mass Spectrometry, Ultraviolet Spectroscopy, Electron Spin Resonance Spectroscopy, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (Recent Developments), Use of Various Spectral by F. Scheinmann (Eds.)


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